e-book

Glut of Bananas? This may be a cook book for you.

“Bananas About Bananas” by Terri Bateman & Sarah Jackson 

Are you bananas about bananas? Do you grow your own, or have you found yourself with an abundance of the product and no idea how to use them? This could be the book for you.

“Bananas about Bananas” is the first in the “When it all becomes too much” mini cook book series by Terri Bateman & Sarah Jackson. This easy to use e-book contains some useful banana facts and 20 easy to make recipes to help you manage your glut of fruit.  At around $1:30 to buy, its a cheap and fun reference book that you will return to over and over again.

AVAILABLE THROUGH AMAZON (E-BOOK): AU, USA, UK, CA or search for “Bananas about Bananas” through Amazon in your country.

For more information about the “When it all becomes too much” cook book series, follow the link: “When it all becomes too much”

 

Spring, Spring Gardening, Spring has Sprung

Spring is here!

Spring has sprung! (Apparently). It’s still darn cold, but it’s time to get out there and start planning for the Summer months.

 THINGS TO DO IN SPRING

  • Order summer seedlings
  • Propagate summer seeds
  • Start removing finished winter crops
  • Conduct soil tests on veg beds
  • Mulch veg beds, fertilise (add manure, compost and alike)
  • Weeding
  • Clean and repair outdoor furniture
  • Clean BBQ

Stay tuned for more Spring posts!

Maintenance, Pruning, Winter

Pruning season

 Winter is the best time to prune your deciduous trees, and unsightly shrubs, as this is when the plant is dormant or at its slowest growth point.

Pruning can be a daunting prospect for the inexperienced, but it’s really not that difficult. Even if you make a mistake, your plants will be forgiving.

The first thing that you need to do is ensure that you have clean and sharp tools. You may use a pruning knife (suitable for smaller branches and roses), secateurs (suitable for small branches) and a pruning saw (suitable for larger branches/bigger jobs).  Make sure that you are wearing a long shirt, and a sturdy pair of garden gloves. (I recommend that you wear glasses to protect your eyes).

  1. Remove any dead branches, flowers and leaves.
  2. Remove any canes (branches), which are growing in towards the centre of the plant. (You are aiming for a vase shape – unless you are cutting a topiary).
  3. Cut back the remaining canes (branches) by up to two-thirds.
  4. Cut above a knot in the branch.
  5. Fertilise the plant if it needs it.

Happy Pruning!